A study by David A. Crawford, MD, Richard L. Andrews, BS, Michael J. Morris, MD, Jason M. Hurst, MD, Adolph V. Lombardi Jr., MD, FACS, Keith R. Berend, MD

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study is to review the incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing outpatient primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who used a portable pneumatic compression device as part of their VTE prophylaxis protocol.
Methods: A retrospective review of all outpatient primary TKA procedures in which patients used ambulatory pneumatic compression pumps as part of their multimodal VTE prophylaxis was performed from 2016 through 2018. This yielded a cohort of 1131 patients (1453 TKAs). An aspirin (ASA)-based protocol was used in patients with standard VTE risk receiving either 81 mg or 325 mg of ASA twice daily for 6 weeks postoperatively. High-risk patients received a stronger chemoprophylaxis for 2 weeks followed by ASA for 4 weeks. Pneumatic compression pumps were worn for 23 hours/day for 14 days.

Results

VTE prophylaxis medication was 81-mg ASA in 56% of patients, 325-mg ASA in 10% of patients, and stronger chemoprophylaxis in 34% of patients. Patients were considered morbidly obese (body mass index >40 kg/m2) in 267 (18.4%) procedures. Ninety-seven (6.7%) patients had a preoperative history of VTE event. Forty-nine duplex ultrasounds were performed (3.3% of TKAs). Confirmed VTE events were documented in only 5 (0.3%) patients. All VTEs occurred in high-risk patients who were discharged on stronger chemoprophylaxis. The time (days) to VTE was 3, 3, 7, 45, and 88 days.
Conclusion: The use of portable pneumatic compression pumps as part of a multimodal VTE prophylaxis protocol aided in a very low rate of symptomatic VTE events in patients undergoing outpatient primary TKA.

This study was published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons

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