Supporting Studies and Reference Sources

DVT Affects Over 2 Million Americans Each Year.

*Gerotziafas GT, Samama MM. Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism medical patients. CurrOpin PulmMed.2004; 10:356-365.

Your DVT risk is greatest 5-10 days after surgery.

*Warsick D, Friedman RJ, Agnelli G, et al. Insuf cient duration of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee replacement when compared with the time course of thromboembolic events: ndings from the Global Orthopaedic Registry. J Bone Joint Surg BR. 2007;89-B(6):79- 807.

*Geerts WH, Bergqvist D, Pineo GF, et al. Prevention of venous thromboembolism: American college of chest physicians evidence- basedclinical practice guidelines (8th edition). Chest. 2008; 133 (6 Suppl):381S-453

*Frederick A. Anderson, Jr., PhD, Anne-Marie Audet, MD, MSC, FACP. (2010) “Best practices—Preventing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.” UMass Medical School, Center for Outcomes Research.

Venous Thromboembolism Following Major Orthopedic Surgery: What is the Risk After Discharge?

Meds + compression treatment cuts DVT risk 75%.

The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4. “Combined intermittent pneumatic leg compression and pharmacological prophylaxis for prevention of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients (Review)”. Kakkos SK, Caprini JA, Geroulakos G, Nicolaides AN, Stansby GP, Reddy DJ

More Americans die from DVT than breast cancer, AIDS and traffic fatalities — COMBINED.

1. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/data.html

Heitj et al. Blood 2005; 106:267a, Venous Thromboembolism: A Need for More Public Awareness and Research Into Mechanisms

Many factors determine your risk for DVT, but studies show you’re at highest risk five to 10 days after surgery.

2. Warsick D, Friedman RJ, Agnelli G, et al. Insuf cient duration of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee replacement when compared with the time course of thromboembolic events: ndings from the Global Orthopaedic Registry. J Bone Joint Surg BR. 2007;89-B(6):79- 807.

3. Michael G. Zywiel, MD; Aaron J. Johnson, MD; Michael A. Mont, MD; (2010) “DVT prophylaxis: better living through chemistry: opposes”. Orthopedics, September;33(9):643.

In fact, combining compression therapy with medications cuts DVT risk by 75%

4. The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4. “Combined intermittent pneumatic leg compression and pharmacological prophylaxis for prevention of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients (Review)”. Kakkos SK, Caprini JA, Geroulakos G, Nicolaides AN, Stansby GP, Reddy DJ.

Fact is, nearly 50 percent of all DVT cases happen after a patient is discharged.

5. Joseph A. Caprini, MD, MS, (2006). “Venous thromboembolism following major orthopedic surgery: what is the risk after discharge?”. Orthopedics. June; 29 (6): 506.

Still, DVT/VTE is the leading cause of preventable hospital deaths.

6. Hospital-Acquired VTE Still a Leading Cause of Death (2012)

Research shows 2 in 100 patients admitted to a hospital dies because of pulmonary embolism (PE), which is a result of DVT.

7. Kopcke D, Harryman O, Benbow E, Hay C, Chalmers N, Mortality From Pulmonary Embolism is Decreasing in Hospital Patients. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 2011 Aug; 104(8)

Using DVT prophylaxis will reduce the incidence of DVT never events during the post-operative period by two-thirds.

8. The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4. “Combined intermittent pneumatic leg compression and pharmacological prophylaxis for prevention of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients (Review)”. Kakkos SK, Caprini JA, Geroulakos G, Nicolaides AN, Stansby GP, Reddy DJ.

The cost to diagnose and treat DVT and its effects in the United States is estimated to be as much as $23.8 billion per year.

9. Cundiff D.K. “AnticoagulationTherapy For VenousThromboembolism”. MedGenMed.2004;6(3):5. * Cited research indicates a cost to diagnose and treat VTE as $3.2 billion to $15.5 billion in 1992 dollars. With an adjusted inflation rate over this period of 2.47%, (according to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor and Statistics) this cost becomes $5.1 billion to $23.8 billion.

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) kills up to 300,000 people in the U.S. each year.

10. Heitj et al. Blood 2005; 106:267a, Venous Thromboembolism: A Need for More Public Awareness and Research Into Mechanisms

Complications from DVT are the second leading cause of death among cancer patients.

Lessons from French national guidelines on the treatment of venous thrombosis and central venous catheter thrombosis in cancer patients
Dominique Fargea,*, Cecile Durantb, Ste ́phane Villiersc, Anne Longe, Alfred Mahrf, Michel Martyd, Philippe Debourdeaud, for the Groupe Francophone Thrombose et Cancer (GFTC)

More than 50% of people who died from cancer developed DVT.

VTE Guide for Executive Leadership

The DVT risk for those undergoing chemotherapy is two times as high as for those without cancer.

VTE Guide for Executive Leadership

Nearly 50 percent of all DVT cases happen after a patient is discharged from the hospital.

Joseph A. Caprini, MD, MS, (2006). “Venous thromboembolism following major orthopedic surgery: what is the risk after discharge?” Orthopedics. June; 29 (6): 506.

VTE is three times as likely in an outpatient setting as opposed to a hospital health care facility.

Amir K. Jaffer. “An overview of venous thromboembolism: Impact, risks, and issues in prophylaxis” Cleveland Journal of Medicine, Vol 75, Supp 3, Apr 2008

Modern mechanical compression devices are often equally — if not more effective — in reducing mortality, are easy to use with high patient compliance and have no bleeding complications.

Michael G. Zywiel, MD; Aaron J. Johnson, MD; Michael A. Mont, MD; (2010) “DVT prophylaxis: better living through chemistry: opposes” Orthopedics, September;33(9):643.